July 25, 2014
cloudya:

My dad was arrested a few months ago.
That’s hard to say. It’s even harder to believe.
Out of the blue, some cops showed up at my dad’s door and told him someone had accused him of theft and assault. My dad was locked up. He was subjected to a full body search and put in a jail cell. He had to spend the night there while my family scrambled to make bail.
But here’s the thing: my dad was working at the time of the alleged crime. He’s a delivery person for a pharmaceutical company. He has his clients’ signatures and paperwork, as well as their verbal confirmations that they saw him, as evidence to back him up. He has his cell phone triangulation data which puts him nowhere near the alleged victim. Moreover, my dad is not a criminal. He’s not violent. He’s 65 years old. He’s a freaking vegan.
None of this matters. All you need in order to be arrested is an accusation. The police didn’t check my dad’s whereabouts or look into the feasibility of the accuser’s story. They didn’t care. The reality of the justice system is that you are guilty until you can prove yourself innocent.
And good luck with that because it’s going to cost you.  Bail fees, attorney fees, court fees – my dad has had to deal with all of them. And then, to make matters worse, his company fired him because he now has an arrest record.
What about the accuser?  It has since surfaced that he’s acquainted with of one of the men on my dad’s delivery route. This man was angry because my dad refused to leave deliveries on without obtaining a signature. My dad refused to do this because it’s against the law. He is required to get a signature. So this man concocted a way to teach my dad a lesson. He supplied his friend with my dad’s name and description, and he got him to tell a lie. A lie that has cost my dad his job, his savings, and his pride. A lie that is still hanging over him as court dates get pushed back and back and back.
The evidence is with my dad.  His case is open and shut. He is innocent. Unfortunately, prosecutors keep asking for and receiving more time to prepare. This has now dragged on for over 7 months. Until he gets his hearing, my dad is unable to work. He has to pay his lawyer’s retainer. He has to pay the mortgage. He has to make ends meet.
My dad has paid over $14,000 in legal fees. Now he’s unemployed and still owes upwards of $7500. My brother and I have given him everything we have. And still, the costs keep piling up. We are drowning.
I’ve started a fund to raise money for my dad. If you can donate just one dollar or two, it would help us out so much. If you can’t, please consider reblogging? Anything you can do – anything at all – would be incredibly appreciated.
The truth is that this isn’t the kind of thing you want to share with the world.  I don’t want to stand, hat-in-hand, before my friends and say, “help me.” But I have to. For my dad, who taught me that we do whatever we can to help the ones we love. He has always, always fought for me. So it’s my turn to fight for him.

If they ever ask you why no one should trust law enforcement in America (and why arrest records are completely bogus), this is why. Let’s help this man out. 
— From NYC.

cloudya:

My dad was arrested a few months ago.

That’s hard to say. It’s even harder to believe.

Out of the blue, some cops showed up at my dad’s door and told him someone had accused him of theft and assault. My dad was locked up. He was subjected to a full body search and put in a jail cell. He had to spend the night there while my family scrambled to make bail.

But here’s the thing: my dad was working at the time of the alleged crime. He’s a delivery person for a pharmaceutical company. He has his clients’ signatures and paperwork, as well as their verbal confirmations that they saw him, as evidence to back him up. He has his cell phone triangulation data which puts him nowhere near the alleged victim. Moreover, my dad is not a criminal. He’s not violent. He’s 65 years old. He’s a freaking vegan.

None of this matters. All you need in order to be arrested is an accusation. The police didn’t check my dad’s whereabouts or look into the feasibility of the accuser’s story. They didn’t care. The reality of the justice system is that you are guilty until you can prove yourself innocent.

And good luck with that because it’s going to cost you.  Bail fees, attorney fees, court fees – my dad has had to deal with all of them. And then, to make matters worse, his company fired him because he now has an arrest record.

What about the accuser?  It has since surfaced that he’s acquainted with of one of the men on my dad’s delivery route. This man was angry because my dad refused to leave deliveries on without obtaining a signature. My dad refused to do this because it’s against the law. He is required to get a signature. So this man concocted a way to teach my dad a lesson. He supplied his friend with my dad’s name and description, and he got him to tell a lie. A lie that has cost my dad his job, his savings, and his pride. A lie that is still hanging over him as court dates get pushed back and back and back.

The evidence is with my dad.  His case is open and shut. He is innocent. Unfortunately, prosecutors keep asking for and receiving more time to prepare. This has now dragged on for over 7 months. Until he gets his hearing, my dad is unable to work. He has to pay his lawyer’s retainer. He has to pay the mortgage. He has to make ends meet.

My dad has paid over $14,000 in legal fees. Now he’s unemployed and still owes upwards of $7500. My brother and I have given him everything we have. And still, the costs keep piling up. We are drowning.

I’ve started a fund to raise money for my dad. If you can donate just one dollar or two, it would help us out so much. If you can’t, please consider reblogging? Anything you can do – anything at all – would be incredibly appreciated.

The truth is that this isn’t the kind of thing you want to share with the world.  I don’t want to stand, hat-in-hand, before my friends and say, “help me.” But I have to. For my dad, who taught me that we do whatever we can to help the ones we love. He has always, always fought for me. So it’s my turn to fight for him.

If they ever ask you why no one should trust law enforcement in America (and why arrest records are completely bogus), this is why. Let’s help this man out. 

— From NYC.

(via lnthefade)

July 21, 2014

The RATP, public transports for Paris, launched this campaign to teach people how to behave. 

Some of these seem obvious, but given our experience in NYC and SF (+Madrid, Brussels, yes, Paris, and other places), we know they’re not a luxury.

See, for example, the tortoise who keeps his backpack on his shoulders instead of placing it against his legs (I’m looking at you, tourists), or the lovebirds, who stand side-by-side on the escalator. Or the hen, who speaks loudly on her telephone. The warthog, who eats stinky food and leaves a mess, and the elephants, who don’t let passengers off the train. I’m not including the koalas, who don’t fold their prams when there is more than one pram in the same space.

There are some missing, of course, like the pole hogs, who will hug a pole instead of holding it with one hand and standing at a distance to let others reach for it. 

I wish more cities with public transports launched similar campaigns. Lord knows we need them.

— From NYC. 

July 18, 2014
laughingsquid:

Artist Creates ‘Bump Paintings’ on the Bellies of Pregnant Women

No.
— From NYC.

laughingsquid:

Artist Creates ‘Bump Paintings’ on the Bellies of Pregnant Women

No.

— From NYC.

June 22, 2014
Imagine you are a news editor. A global terrorist group involved in fighting in Syria and Iraq sends you a recording whose contents would put them in jail were they in your country. Do you publish it or not? It’s a big question that I think centers on the definition of “public interest” as much as coverage of Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky. It also goes back to 2006, when Al-Qaida and Osama bin Laden repeatedly sent recordings to Al Jazeera, which then dutifully broadcast it on their channel. I don’t like the fact that a terrorist organization can use (independent) media to make their claims and messages heard widely. Today, youtube and twitter mean they don’t even need the mainstream press to pick up their words. Social media does that job.

Yet, on Saturday, many British newspapers, TV and radio stations lead with a story about a youtube video that shows young British muslims in the Middle East calling for others to join them in the fight against infidels with the British government racing to take down the video before it causes any harm. To me, the fact that extremists would record such a video is not a surprise and therefore not news. Why British media decided to put it on their front pages is beyond me. What makes it worse is the quality of the coverage. “Militants in Iraq show they can run a sophisticated social media campaign” – No, really? They’re not idiots that live in the Stone Age? “Politicians and religious leaders in Britain warn young people not to join the conflict” – yeah, that’s going to make them change their mind. If Cameron says I shouldn’t fight, I won’t.

The coverage fails to ask the really important questions: what makes young muslims in Britain think that this is their war to fight?

Imagine you are a news editor. A global terrorist group involved in fighting in Syria and Iraq sends you a recording whose contents would put them in jail were they in your country. Do you publish it or not? It’s a big question that I think centers on the definition of “public interest” as much as coverage of Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky. It also goes back to 2006, when Al-Qaida and Osama bin Laden repeatedly sent recordings to Al Jazeera, which then dutifully broadcast it on their channel. I don’t like the fact that a terrorist organization can use (independent) media to make their claims and messages heard widely. Today, youtube and twitter mean they don’t even need the mainstream press to pick up their words. Social media does that job.

Yet, on Saturday, many British newspapers, TV and radio stations lead with a story about a youtube video that shows young British muslims in the Middle East calling for others to join them in the fight against infidels with the British government racing to take down the video before it causes any harm. To me, the fact that extremists would record such a video is not a surprise and therefore not news. Why British media decided to put it on their front pages is beyond me. What makes it worse is the quality of the coverage. “Militants in Iraq show they can run a sophisticated social media campaign” – No, really? They’re not idiots that live in the Stone Age? “Politicians and religious leaders in Britain warn young people not to join the conflict” – yeah, that’s going to make them change their mind. If Cameron says I shouldn’t fight, I won’t.

The coverage fails to ask the really important questions: what makes young muslims in Britain think that this is their war to fight?

June 18, 2014
proofmathisbeautiful:

Despite Mayer, Yahoo leadership overwhelmingly male
Chris Isidore
Yahoo, one of the most prominent Silicon Valley companies with a female CEO, still has an overwhelmingly male work force and leadership.
The company released its first diversity report late Tuesday and it showed that 62% of its global work force is male. But many of the women are in the lower-paying non-technical and non-leadership positions. The company said 85% of its technology staff is male, as is 77% of its leadership.

Hey, don’t blame Mayer. She did warn us she’s not a feminist, didn’t she.* 
— From NYC. 
*Backwards italics sarcasm.

proofmathisbeautiful:

Despite Mayer, Yahoo leadership overwhelmingly male

Yahoo, one of the most prominent Silicon Valley companies with a female CEO, still has an overwhelmingly male work force and leadership.

The company released its first diversity report late Tuesday and it showed that 62% of its global work force is male. But many of the women are in the lower-paying non-technical and non-leadership positions. The company said 85% of its technology staff is male, as is 77% of its leadership.

Hey, don’t blame Mayer. She did warn us she’s not a feminist, didn’t she.* 

— From NYC. 

*Backwards italics sarcasm.

June 16, 2014
"I’m quite enjoying how bad this game is. It’s utter nonsense. Nothing is happening. But it makes you appreciate how good every other match has been."

— Jacob Steinberg, on Iran vs. Nigeria (The Guardian)

(Source: girldetectivewatchesfootball)

June 16, 2014
What happens when the whole of the United States reads “The Secret.” 
Yes, Argentina said Argentina and Spain said Spain. But we know Argentina hates Brazil with a passion and would rather die than say “Brazil” first. And Spain, at least, is a plausible win (at least it was before Friday’s ass-kicking). 
— Thanks to Greg Minton, from NYC. 

What happens when the whole of the United States reads “The Secret.” 

Yes, Argentina said Argentina and Spain said Spain. But we know Argentina hates Brazil with a passion and would rather die than say “Brazil” first. And Spain, at least, is a plausible win (at least it was before Friday’s ass-kicking). 

— Thanks to Greg Minton, from NYC. 

June 13, 2014
This may be the first time my husband “faves” a joke I made in French. I am swooning.
— From NYC.

This may be the first time my husband “faves” a joke I made in French. I am swooning.

— From NYC.

June 10, 2014
Jason and I have had loads of questions about what kind of twins we’re having. Our answer is invariably “we don’t know.” And if they’re the same sex, we won’t know until they are born, possibly even after. 
I tweeted a full explanation as to why that is. Here it also is (with extra link goodness).
— From NYC.

Jason and I have had loads of questions about what kind of twins we’re having. Our answer is invariably “we don’t know.” And if they’re the same sex, we won’t know until they are born, possibly even after. 

I tweeted a full explanation as to why that is. Here it also is (with extra link goodness).

— From NYC.

June 10, 2014

Sorry, but I’m not even a little bit sorry.

— From NYC

June 1, 2014
Some fruity ideas from one of my favorite graphic designers, Sarah Illenberger. "This portfolio of images began on a food market stroll in Tuscany/Italy. From the Melon-choly to Pome-grenade, almost every fruit or vegetable was given a new meaning."
Click here to see the others.— From London.

Some fruity ideas from one of my favorite graphic designers, Sarah Illenberger.

"This portfolio of images began on a food market stroll in Tuscany/Italy. From the Melon-choly to Pome-grenade, almost every fruit or vegetable was given a new meaning."

Click here to see the others.

— From London.

May 31, 2014
Gone Too Soon

whenwomenrefuse:

Kelly and I grew up together from kindergarten until I moved away when I was fourteen. I remember her getting along with everyone, she was always happy and loud. I was shocked to hear about the news of her death a few years ago, sometimes I still can’t believe such an exuberant girl’s life was taken in such a violent matter. 

I hope everyone is following “When Woman Refuse.” Nothing will ever change until everybody realises how dire things actually are, and make it clear this shit is intolerable.

— From NYC.

May 29, 2014
jasonpermenter:

At the vet. SO angry. (at Vinegar Hill Veterinary Group)

My sweet baby girl. We’ve got you, doll.
— From NYC.

jasonpermenter:

At the vet. SO angry. (at Vinegar Hill Veterinary Group)

My sweet baby girl. We’ve got you, doll.

— From NYC.

May 23, 2014
That’s how you transform a London black cab into an airplane when you are a two-year old. — From London. No longer searching for my tampons.

That’s how you transform a London black cab into an airplane when you are a two-year old.

— From London. No longer searching for my tampons.

May 16, 2014

wnyc:

Workers clipping love locks off the Brooklyn Bridge.

Me: “Everytime you clip a lock, someone gets a divorce!”

Guy: “We got to keep the lawyers in business!”

There are few people I love more in this city than the lock-clipping workers of the Brooklyn Bridge. Please join me in thanking them for their service.

— From NYC.

(via npr)